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The first four semesters of Saint James School of Medicine’s MD Program will help you build a strong foundation for your medical career.

Our Basic Sciences curriculum consists of lectures, research and lab-based teaching at our two Caribbean medical school campuses. All courses are designed in the USMLE format, and study is supplemented with hands-on clinical training at the local hospital whenever possible.

Small class sizes offer you one-on-one attention from our experienced, enthusiastic professors. Tutoring, mentoring and one-on-one guidance are all available. Our supportive student community offers plenty of opportunities for peer-led learning groups.

STUDYING IN THE CARIBBEAN

Saint James has a diverse student body, a multi-national faculty, and a close-knit multicultural environment. Community outreach events like our annual Health Fair offer our students the opportunity to experience what it is like to practice in the local community.

Studying medicine in a different culture offers you many benefits. It can challenge your assumptions, expose you to new ideas and expand your learning opportunities. Interacting with a wide range of people from the very beginning of your medical career can give you more confidence and empathy as a doctor, and make you a better communicator.

THE SAINT JAMES EXPERIENCE

There are rarely better places to study the Basic Sciences than the Caribbean. Our students work hard, then recharge on beautiful beaches. Life is simple, there are few distractions and our students’ excellent results show how successful a top quality Caribbean medical school education can be.

SAINT JAMES OFFERS YOU:

  • Two well-equipped Caribbean Medical campuses
  • One of the best value medical schools with some of the lowest fees in the Caribbean
  • No MCAT required
  • Close-knit, supportive community
  • Tutoring, mentoring and good one-on-one guidance
  • Accreditation, recognition and approvals from key agencies, organizations, and governments

“The professors here are incredibly helpful. They reach out if they see that you’re struggling.”

Dr. David Klein, graduate, Saint James School of Medicine

“Medicine was my dream since I was really young … and so I chose to come to Saint James. Tuition is very reasonable. The Caribbean’s a fantastic place to study.”

Cristy, MD2, Saint James St. Vincent

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Start your career in medicine

For more information on Saint James School of Medicine please fill out our short contact form and one of our admissions advisors will be in touch. Alternatively you can call us at 800-542-1553 or email us at info@mail.sjsm.org.

If you would like to start the application process right away, please complete our short online application form and we will guide you through the rest of our simple application process.

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Saint James School of Medicine Basic Science Curriculum

SEMESTER 1

Histology (11 credits)

The Histology course encompasses the study of microscopic anatomy of human cells, tissues, and organs. Emphasis is given to their functions and clinical significance. The laboratory hours provide the student with the opportunity to study stained and mounted sections of tissues and organs. Students also analyze high quality histological sections and electron micrographs projected on screen.

Anatomy & Embryology (20 credits)

This course focuses on the anatomical and embryological basis of clinical medicine. Anatomy and Embryology are fundamental to medical education, providing students with their most basic foundation for medical practice. This anatomical foundation is used throughout their career by practitioners and in virtually every realm of medicine, from research to practice to medical education. The classroom lectures provide both regional and systemic overviews of the human body. Supervised laboratory sessions provide students the privilege of dissecting the human body and its anatomical structures. They learn from direct experience the structures discussed in lectures and encountered daily in medical practice. The course also incorporates embryology that is divided into General Embryology that deals with the formation and development of germ cells, fertilization and early development of the human embryo; and Special Embryology that deals with the formation and malformations of different organs. This course helps students’ acquire the ability to understand, analyze and solve problems in other medical courses and in the clinical management of diseases

Medical & Legal Ethics (4 credits)

This course has been designed to introduce the student to Medical Ethics, with emphasis on its role in clinical practice. The student is expected to demonstrate the ability to recognize ethical problems in a clinical situation and to propose a solution to difficult ethical issues, sometimes with incomplete data.

CCBS I (Clinical Correlation of Basic Science) (1 credit)

This course has been designed to introduce the student to case-enhanced problem-based learning. In this approach, fundamental knowledge is mastered by the solving of problems. Information is learned or reviewed by the student in an active learning mode and promotes lifelong learning. This case-enhanced style employs student initiative as the driving force for problem solving. The students’ group assumes primary responsibility for the process and the professor is a knowledgeable facilitator. Teamwork, open inquiry and critical thinking are emphasized. At this level, the list of clinically-oriented cases/topics is taken from the MD1 Subjects.

SEMESTER 2

Physiology (10 credits)

This course has been designed to introduce medical school students to a basic understanding of the concepts and principles of physiology and some clinical implications in relevant diseases. This course requires students to integrate physiology with other basic sciences such as Anatomy, Pathology, Pathophysiology as well as other related courses. You will make an oral presentation on a specified medical subject to your peers in class.

Biochemistry & Genetics (14 credits)

This course has been designed to provide the student with a broad understanding of the concepts and principles of Biochemistry and Genetics, with emphasis on their roles in clinical practice. The course provides students with a strong background in basic components of biochemistry – amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, enzymes and nucleotides. They will also learn the biochemical aspects of the functioning of major organs, tissues and systems (e.g., blood, liver, gastrointestinal tract, endocrines). Finally, to bring all the different facets together in a holistic overview, the students will be taught the fundamentals of nutrition. Special lectures on significant topics are provided throughout the course, as will 4 sessions on the practical clinical laboratory applications of the Biochemistry course content. At all stages the clinical relevance of biochemistry will be emphasized to the students, using general examples, specific cases and lectures dedicated to disorders and diseases in each section. Also included in the course are in-depth concepts and principles of genetics, with emphasis on its role in clinical practice. Students are provided with a strong background in the principles of molecular genetics. Other topics include single gene disorders, atypical inheritances, multifactorial inheritances, chromosomal disorders, prenatal diagnosis, treatment of genetic diseases, cancer genetics, gene therapy and genetic counseling. Students are also made aware of the power of DNA technology. Basic concepts of DNA manipulations will be taught and examples of how these manipulations can be used in medicine will be given.

Neurosciences (6 credits)

The course has been designed to introduce the student to a basic understanding of the concepts and principles of the anatomy of the nervous system, with emphasis on its role in clinical practice. Students are provided with a strong background in the principles of the Anatomy of the Nervous System and the physiological and pathological role of neurons and nerves in clinical practice.

Genetics (4 credits)

The course has been designed to introduce students at Saint James School of Medicine to a basic understanding of the concepts and principles of genetics, with an emphasis on its role in clinical practice. Students are provided with a strong background in the principles of molecular genetics. Other topics include: single gene disorders, atypical inheritances, multifactorial inheritances, chromosomal disorders, prenatal diagnosis, and treatment of genetic diseases, cancer genetics, gene therapy and genetic counseling. Students are also made aware of DNA technology. Basic concepts of DNA manipulations will be taught and examples of how these manipulations can be used in medicine will be given.

RHM I (Research in Health and Medicine) (1 credit)

This course has been designed to provide the student with an introduction to research literature review and presentation of their resultant assessment/interpretation of the significance of that review. It will consist of weekly two-hour sessions, during which the student will be introduced to the process of searching through medical research literature, later applying that process yourself.

CCBS II (Clinical Correlation of Basic Science) (1 credit)

This second course in CCBS further introduces the student to case-enhanced problem based learning. In this approach, fundamental knowledge is mastered by the solving of problems.  Information is learned or reviewed by the student in an active learning mode and promotes lifelong learning. This case-enhanced style employs student initiative as the driving force for problem solving. The students’ group assumes primary responsibility for the process and the professor is a knowledgeable facilitator. Teamwork, open inquiry and critical thinking are emphasized. At this level, the list of clinically-oriented cases/topics is taken from the MD1 and MD2 Subjects.

SEMESTER 3

Pathology I (11 credits)

This course is the first of two pathology courses at Saint James. The first semester, also called General Pathology, deals with the basic concept of the various disease processes in the body, the causes and mechanisms of disease and the associated alterations in the structure and function. The second semester, also called Systemic Pathology, deals with the disease processes affecting various systems and different organs in the body.

Microbiology (10 credits)

This course introduces basic concepts of infectious disease, the body’s immune response, epidemiology, prevention, as well as medical treatments of infectious diseases. In this course, you will gain medical knowledge of microorganisms and their relationship to humans in health and disease. The medical microbiology course focuses on human diseases (infectious diseases) caused by microorganisms like bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites. The relationship of medical microbiology to other health related sciences will also be highlighted and these sciences include, but are not limited to: human immunology, cell biology, human pathology, human histology, human physiology, molecular biology, human genetics and biochemistry as it relates to humans in health or disease.

Pharmacology (10 credits)

This course is designed to prepare students at Saint James School of Medicine for the clinical study of therapeutics by providing knowledge of the manner in which drugs modify biological functions. It includes a systematic study of the effects of drugs on different organ systems and disease processes, the mechanisms by which drugs produce their therapeutic and toxic effects, and the factors influencing their absorption, distribution and biological actions.

Medical Psychology (4 credits)

Psychology is the scientific and empirical study of human behavior and mental processes. By the end of the course, the medical student is expected to understand the concepts of psychology and psychological disorders as well as their treatments.

RHM II (Research in Health and Medicine) (1 credit)

This course intends to provide students with a background in the basic knowledge of research methods and to introduce students to research. They will learn to critically review articles published in scientific journals and practice making presentations. The students will also start their research projects during RHM II. They will be expected to originate the project within the scope of what is possible within the available infrastructure, produce a project proposal, commence and pursue the project, and provide a brief progress report at the end of RHM III.

CCBS III (Clinical Correlation of Basic Science) (1 credit)

This third course in CCBS provides more practice in case-enhanced problem based learning. In this approach, fundamental knowledge is mastered by the solving of problems. Information is learned or reviewed by the student in an active learning mode and promotes lifelong learning. This case-enhanced style employs student initiative as the driving force for problem solving. The students’ group assumes primary responsibility for the process and the professor is a knowledgeable facilitator. Teamwork, open inquiry and critical thinking are emphasized. At this level, the list of clinically-oriented cases/topics is taken from the MD1 through MD3 Subjects.

SEMESTER 4

Pathology II (11 credits)

During this second semester of pathology, also called Systemic Pathology, students learn how to apply the pathological mechanisms learned in the third semester to organs and organ systems of the human body.

Epidemiology and Biostatistics (4 Credits)

The course has been designed to provide the student with a broad understanding of the concepts and principles of epidemiology and biostatistics with emphasis on its role in health, medicine and research. They will also be taught and involved in the data collection, tabulation and summarization and presentation of data and reporting. Also, special lectures on solving problems will be provided throughout the course in four sessions on practical applications of the epidemiology and biostatistics course content.

Physical Diagnosis & Clinical Medicine (10 credits)

The Physical Diagnosis course serves as an introduction to clinical medicine. Students will acquire the knowledge and skills essential for eliciting a medical history and conducting a physical examination. The course emphasizes the importance of patient interviewing, acquiring knowledge on symptoms and signs of common and specific diseases and disorders and performing a comprehensive physical examination for respective diseases.

RHM III (Research in Health and Medicine) (1 credit)

The final course of the RHM sequence in this semester has two components. Students must build upon prior knowledge acquired in RHM I and RHM II to perform a comprehensive literature search on a chosen topic of concurrent medical interest and present a comprehensive review or recent publication in a reputed scientific journals on the topic. Students pursue the project initiated in RHM II by planning, executing and reporting on the research project. Senior faculty members of Saint James guide the students with their research projects. The course has been designed to provide the student with a more in-depth understanding of the use of research literature review, and requires presentation of their resultant assessment and interpretation and the significance of their project work. Students are expected to submit a written paper for credit on their project, conforming to the guidelines of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

CCBS IV (Clinical Correlation of Basic Science) (1 credit)

This final course in CCBS provides practice in case-enhanced problem-based learning that integrates what has been learned in Basic Science. In this approach, fundamental knowledge is mastered by the solving of problems. Information is learned or reviewed by the student in an active learning mode and promotes lifelong learning. This case-enhanced style employs student initiative as the driving force for problem solving. The students’ group assumes primary responsibility for the process and the professor is a knowledgeable facilitator. Teamwork, open inquiry and critical thinking are emphasized. At this level, the list of clinically-oriented cases/topics is taken from the MD1 through MD4 Subjects.

SEMESTER 5

SEMESTER 5 (FOR STUDENTS MATRICULATING FROM SUMMER 2016 ONWARDS)

Basic Science Review Course (30 Credits)

This course is designed to integrate the knowledge, attitude and practices from MD1 through MD4 and apply it in clinical scenarios. Students will be given adequate exposure to various lecture material and active learning which are geared towards constructive reinforcement of the students’ critical thinking and skills required for clinical sciences.

Basic Science Introduction to Clinical Medicine/ ICM (10 credits)

This course is designed to acquaint students with the clinical aspects of the disease including epidemiology, etiology, pathophysiology or pathogenesis, clinical findings and laboratory investigations. Students are encouraged to apply this information to form a differential diagnosis and disease management plan. This will help prepare the students for their clinical rotations and hospital clerkships, as well as teach them to apply the basic sciences information in clinical situations, which is the main goal of this course. Lectures are given by professors with significant clinical experience. These lectures cover a variety of disease conditions that are commonly encountered in hospital and clinical practice. A deliberate effort is made to include high yield USMLE related topics in lectures.

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